on enclosed spaces and the great outdoors

curation

During the past years, theatre maker David Weber-Krebs and theoretician/dramaturge Jeroen Peeters have been developing the project On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors. This project addresses the question: how are the arts (its questions, forms, research and discourses) challenged by climate change?

So far, it’s taken on the form of a performative conference that had four editions:
On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors – 1. More than Human Participation (De Brakke Grond, 2015)
On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors – 2. Limits of Human Sensorium (Kaaitheater, 2018)
On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors – 3. Decolonial Ecologies (De Brakke Grond, 2020)
On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors – 4. Grounding (Kaaitheater, 2021)

concept by
david weber-krebs & jeroen peeters
curated by
david weber-krebs & jeroen peeters
supported by
kaaitheater, DAS theatre, gerrit rietveld academie, brakke grond, BUDA kunstencentrum, damaged goods

watch the two previous editions of On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors

On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors - 1. More than Human Participation

18-22 March 2015, Brakke Grond, Amsterdam

Curated and hosted by  David Weber-Krebs

With contributions by Andrea Bozic, Andre Eiermann, Nikolaus Gansterer, Maximilian Haas, Mette Ingvartsen, André Lepecki, Jeroen Peeters and David Weber-Krebs.

In the frame of a five days festival/conference organized by the Studium Generale of the Gerrit Rietveld Academie. Convened and moderated by invited curators Claire Tancons (curator, New Orleans), David Weber-Krebs (artist, Brussels), Joanna Warsza (curator, Berlin) and Claire Bishop (art historian, New York).

Usually, people who step into a theatre are of two kinds: the spectators and the actors. The spectators watch the actors.  Both usually are humans.  This happens usually in the enclosed space of theatre. In its symbolism, economy, and practice, theatre is the place where the human stands central with his body and his words.  But what kind of spectatorship applies when challenged by an encounter with a thing, a creature, a flow, fiction, or darkness?  Is it possible to abandon anthropocentrism at all in this game? During this day we are going to focus on the non-human in theatre and outside of it, on stages, screens, and the great outdoors. Spectators will be engaged in various ways by lectures, screenings, performances in and outside the theatre, and a cosmic event.

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please click here to watch the first edition of on enclosed spaces and the great outdoors 

Andrea Božić Day For Night led by David Weber-Krebs & Julia Willms

For this first intervention we met at 11:00 and walked from the Brakke Grond to the Dam.

For the 20th of March, the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and autumn in the Southern, I have prepared a special spectacle titled Day for Night (Total Eclipse of Equinox Sun). The piece features a total eclipse of the Sun that will turn day into night at the moment of the same length of day and night in the whole world. The eclipse of the sun will interrupt this equilibrium of light and darkness.

The performance is a once in a 500 000 years event.

Day for Night is the fourth performance in the series of my collaborations with the night sky titled: Night Sky: Further Investigations Into Choreography, part of the larger cycle of collaborations with the weather titled Telling Future. For this dance, three celestial bodies will align in a straight line. The full blood-red Moon will pass between the Earth and the Sun, temporarily disrupting the coming of the light.

The premium seats for the performance are at the North Pole. As the sun rises at the horizon for the first time after six months of darkness at the North Pole, the Moon covers the Sun and day becomes night again.

The performance will affect all our senses: the temperature falls, insects and birds stop making sounds, the tides get more extreme and the landscape changes dramatically in only a few moments. We are in the Moon’s shadow and we see the Moon’s dark side. Dreams and secrets emerge in the dark.

Seats for the performance in the Moon’s shadow are unlimited but visibility depends on your area. Seats are available with up to 90% degrees of visibility in North Africa, Europe, western Asia, the Pacific, East Asia, Iceland and Greenland. The Netherlands, where we are based, will enjoy the spectacular 87% visibility.

The introduction of the day by Gabrielle Schleijpen.

Jeroen Peeters, It lay like a log absolutely motionless and apparently deprived of all its faculties by our damp climate, so inhospitable to foreign visitors.

To look at art through the lens of theatre – this has, since the proclamation of a so-called performative turn, become a matter of course in the field of theatre studies. But while the lens which is usually applied for this purpose, i.e. the understanding of theatre, remains shaped in most cases by a quite anthropocentric concept of performance, defined on the basis of inter-human encounter, this concept is recently challenged by certain developments in contemporary performing arts. Non-human performers like animals or objects appear. Animated items, substances in motion, and acousmatic voices interfere with or even replace the human body’s presence. Performances occur partly or even entirely without human performers. The lecture asks what kind of consequences such developments entail, and what it means to look at art through a lens correspondingly curved.

Maximilian Haas, Animal Agency.

Higher animals resemble humans in so many ways that philosophy and art have always felt obliged to determine the differences. Western modernity even considers man and animal to be opposites. It is only the human being who possesses language systems, consciousness and social manners, characteristics distinguishing us from the animal. Whether as the zoon politikon, the animal rationale, or – in essentially modern terms – the body-machine that thinks, there is unquestionably one thing man is not: an animal amongst animals. Man has an exceptional position among other worldly lifeforms, which is marked by the distinction between intention and instinct.

Reality is divided into two worlds: we inhabit one world, they inhabit the other. Ours is called culture and is created by free subjects, while theirs is called nature and contains living objects which, however, are without any cognition or will. Empirical encounters with animals, especially in the reinforcing frame of (contemporary) art and theatre, draw a very different picture: Usually the works do not simply show an animal, but always this one animal. Lending their motifs both face and figure, an individual aura, they invite the beholder to speculate about the subject’s biography, character, emotions and passions. In short: they lend the animal subjectivity and highlight its (non-human) agency.

David Weber-Krebs, Performance (Robert Morris Revisited).

 

What is it with the spectacular? To find out, on as to go back to a historic period in modern art, that was seemingly defined by an unparalleled will to be anything but spectacular: the minimalism of the 1960s. Of course, doing little can be quite unspectacular, but doing very little is again most spectacular. And it was. So how is something unspectacular turning into something spectacular? Is it the thought, the speculation, or is it the sight, the spectacle?

Performance (Robert Morris Revisited) is a spectacle and a speculation telling the true story of how the American artist Robert Morris injured his head in 1961.

André Eiermann, Looking through an awry lens.

 

To look at art through the lens of theatre – this has, since the proclamation of a so-called performative turn, become a matter of course in the field of theatre studies. But while the lens which is usually applied for this purpose, i.e. the understanding of theatre, remains shaped in most cases by a quite anthropocentric concept of performance, defined on the basis of inter-human encounter, this concept is recently challenged by certain developments in contemporary performing arts. Non-human performers like animals or objects appear. Animated items, substances in motion, and acousmatic voices interfere with or even replace the human body’s presence. Performances occur partly or even entirely without human performers. The lecture asks what kind of consequences such developments entail, and what it means to look at art through a lens correspondingly curved.

 

André Lepecki, In the Dark.

In this talk, I am interested in thinking about what might be revealed in the dark, particularly by considering some recent performances where darkness is the key element of an illumination without light. Following recent theoretical-aesthetic propositions by Fred Moten, Mette Ingvartsen, Jonathan Crary, Tino Sehgal, I would like to explore how darkness offers us the possibility of a collective modality of experience where depersonalisation and speculation propose an non-enlightened critical stance and a more resonant aesthetics, away from photological imperatives.

Mette Ingvartsen, Speculations.

Imagination, speculation and description, three differently charged modes of address, are in this presentation used to develop ideas in front of an audience. The spectator is not directly participating in the performance but is never the less playing an active role in the encounter. Ideas around artificial nature, catastrophic constructions and the autonomy of objects are being processed through talking, gesturing and moving. Speech and physical actions are given equal value, while being used to materialize a virtual performance within the mind of the spectator.

Concept & Performance: Mette Ingvartsen
Production Management: Kerstin Schroth
Production: Mette Ingvartsen/ Great Investment
Support: Summer Intensive 2011 organized by Christine De Smedt/les ballets C de la B and DOCH (University of dance and circus, Stockholm)

On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors - 2. Limits of the Human Sensorium

10 February 2018 11am – 6pm, Kaaitheater, Brussels
a performance-conference curated by David Weber-Krebs and Jeroen Peeters

With contributions by René ten Bos, Augusto Corrieri, Axel Dörner, Mette Edvardsen, Bryana Fritz, Nikolaus Gansterer, Anne Juren, Michael Marder and Stefanie Wenner.

Co-production BUDA kunstencentrum, Damaged Goods, Kaaitheater.

We live in an age in which human activity has a profound impact on our physical and ecological surroundings. Nevertheless, these transformations often go unseen – they are literally too large or too small for our senses and imagination to take in. How can we create stories, aesthetics, and spaces of experience to deal with this situation reflexively and critically? And in the theatre, how can we focus attention on the many non-human actors and factors that play a role? A variety of hybrid artistic and theoretical interventions are specially created for  On Enclosed Spaces and the Great Outdoors. They’ll resonate with one another in a performative setting and constitute a dramaturgy of an entire day. Lunch and dinner are included.

>      to read more please click here
>      please click here to watch the second edition of oesgo

Introduction of the day by David Weber-Krebs and Jeroen Peeters.

Mette Edvardsen, No Title.

The performance No Title is about how reality exists in language and how this

extends into real space. It is about how memory and imagination blur. It is about things and how things can be there and gone at the same time, and that what defines this is various. It is about things that are gone and about things that remain. No Title is about the awareness that all things are impermanent and that nothing lasts forever. It is about things that have gone before their time and things that never quite disappear. It is about what the piece and its making is, what a piece can do, what it is for, what its power and limit could be. It is about the gap between a world and our ideas of it, the invincible gap between thought and experience, between here and there. No Title is a writing in space, a writing that is both additive and subtractive. It is a writing that traces and erases, that

moves and halts, that looks at things that are not there and recovers that which is instead.

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agenda

kaaitheater, brussels

performative conference

de brakke grond, amsterdam

performative conference

kaaitheater, brussels

performative conference

de brakke grond, amsterdam

performative conference
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